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Anne Estelle Rice - Portrait of Katherine Mansfield, 1918 (x)

Anne Estelle Rice - Portrait of Katherine Mansfield, 1918 (x)

(Source: villettess)

10:00 am ~ marblefeet87 notes

It was an uncertain spring. The weather, perpetually changing, sent clouds of blue and of purple flying over the land. In the country farmers, looking at the fields, were apprehensive; in London umbrellas were opened and then shut by people looking up at the sky. But in April such weather was to be expected. Thousands of shop assistants made that remark, as they handed neat parcels to ladies in flounced dresses standing on the other side of the counter at Whiteley’s and the Army and Navy Stores. Interminable processions of shoppers in the West end, of business men in the East, paraded the pavements, like caravans perpetually marching,—so it seemed to those who had any reason to pause, say, to post a letter, or at a club window in Piccadilly. The stream of landaus, victorias and hansom cabs was incessant; for the season was beginning. In the quieter streets musicians doled out their frail and for the most part melancholy pipe of sound, which was echoed, or parodied, here in the trees of Hyde Park, here in St. James’s by the twitter of sparrows and the sudden outbursts of the amorous but intermittent thrush. The pigeons in the squares shuffled in the tree tops, letting fall a twig or two, and crooned over and over again the lullaby that was always interrupted. The gates at the Marble Arch and Apsley House were blocked in the afternoon by ladies in many-coloured dresses wearing bustles, and by gentlemen in frock coats carrying canes, wearing carnations. Here came the Princess, and as she passed hats were lifted. In the basements of the long avenues of the residential quarters servant girls in cap and apron prepared tea. Deviously ascending from the basement the silver teapot was placed on the table, and virgins and spinsters with hands that had staunched the sores of Bermondsey and Hoxton carefully measured out one, two, three, four spoonfuls of tea. When the sun went down a million little gaslights, shaped like the eyes in peacocks’ feathers, opened in their glass cages, but nevertheless broad stretches of darkness were left on the pavement. The mixed light of the lamps and the setting sun was reflected equally in the placid waters of the Round Pond and the Serpentine. Diners-out, trotting over the Bridge in hansom cabs, looked for a moment at the charming vista. At length the moon rose and its polished coin, though obscured now and then by wisps of cloud, shone out with serenity, with severity, or perhaps with complete indifference. Slowly wheeling, like the rays of a searchlight, the days, the weeks, the years passed one after another across the sky.
Virginia Woolf - The Years, 1937
01:36 pm ~ marblefeet2 notes

It was raining. A fine rain, a gentle shower, was peppering the pavements and making them greasy. Was it worth while opening an umbrella, was it necessary to hail a hansom, people coming out from the theatres asked themselves, looking up at the mild, milky sky in which the stars were blunted. Where it fell on earth, on fields and gardens, it drew up the smell of earth. Here a drop poised on a grass-blade; there filled the cup of a wild flower, till the breeze stirred and the rain was spilt. Was it worth while to shelter under the hawthorn, under the hedge, the sheep seemed to question; and the cows, already turned out in the grey fields, under the dim hedges, munched on, sleepily chewing with raindrops on their hides. Down on the roofs it fell—here in Westminster, there in the Ladbroke Grove; on the wide sea a million points pricked the blue monster like an innumerable shower bath. Over the vast domes, the soaring spires of slumbering University cities, over the leaded libraries, and the museums, now shrouded in brown holland, the gentle rain slid down, till, reaching the mouths of those fantastic laughers, the many-clawed gargoyles, it splayed out in a thousand odd indentations. A drunken man slipping in a narrow passage outside the public house, cursed it. Women in childbirth heard the doctor say to the midwife, “It’s raining.” And the walloping Oxford bells, turning over and over like slow porpoises in a sea of oil, contemplatively intoned their musical incantation. The fine rain, the gentle rain, poured equally over the mitred and the bareheaded with an impartiality which suggested that the god of rain, if there were a god, was thinking Let it not be restricted to the very wise, the very great, but let all breathing kind, the munchers and chewers, the ignorant, the unhappy, those who toil in the furnace making innumerable copies of the same pot, those who bore red hot minds through contorted letters, and also Mrs Jones in the alley, share my bounty.
Virginia Woolf - The Years, 1937
10:11 pm ~ marblefeet2 notes

bookspaperscissors:

Edgar Allan Poe, Pride and Prejudice and The Hobbits Finger Puppets by Rachel Linquist

(Source: sosuperawesome)

07:59 am ~ marblefeet577 notes

A ruffled mind makes a restless pillow.
The Professor, Charlotte Bronte

(via anneboleynsservant)

(via thebrontes)

05:48 am ~ marblefeet12 notes

Robert Louis Stevenson’s university notebook, 1869
National Library of Scotland

Stevenson’s vivid imagination impinged on everything he did. This page is from a notebook from his civil engineering lectures at Edinburgh University in 1869. It is covered with doodles which reveal an active mind and an acute visual sense.

Robert Louis Stevenson’s university notebook, 1869
National Library of Scotland

Stevenson’s vivid imagination impinged on everything he did. This page is from a notebook from his civil engineering lectures at Edinburgh University in 1869. It is covered with doodles which reveal an active mind and an acute visual sense.

02:38 pm ~ marblefeet61 notes

(via haleycue)

09:01 am ~ marblefeet3,675 notes

entregulistanybostan:

Leslie Stephen and Virginia Woolf ca.1910 por Beresford. 
© Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis

entregulistanybostan:

Leslie Stephen and Virginia Woolf ca.1910 por Beresford. 

© Hulton-Deutsch Collection/Corbis

(via myaloysius-deactivated20140503)

07:00 am ~ marblefeet79 notes

HD
Portrait of Anton Pavlovich Chekhov, Osip Braz, 1898

Seeing this painting amongst others on the Portraits of the Belle Époque exhibition made my year.

Portrait of Anton Pavlovich Chekhov, Osip Braz, 1898

Seeing this painting amongst others on the Portraits of the Belle Époque exhibition made my year.

08:00 am ~ marblefeet110 notes

08:01 am ~ marblefeet819 notes

Title page of a 1904 edition of Frances Burney’s Evelina.

You can read a quick account of the writer’s life in this article from History Today.

Title page of a 1904 edition of Frances Burney’s Evelina.

You can read a quick account of the writer’s life in this article from History Today.

02:28 pm ~ marblefeet16 notes

HD
Frances Burney (13 June 1752 – 6 January 1840) by her relative Edward Frances Burney.

Frances Burney (13 June 1752 – 6 January 1840) by her relative Edward Frances Burney.

02:24 pm ~ marblefeet10 notes

05:33 pm ~ marblefeet76 notes

A certain melancholy has been brooding over me this fortnight. I date it from Katherine’s death. The feeling comes to me so often now – Yes. Go on writing of course: but into emptiness. There’s no competitor.
Virginia Woolf, on Katherine Mansfield

(via katherinemansfieldproject)

04:38 am ~ marblefeet53 notes

02:26 am ~ marblefeet