Tagged
charles dickens


(via booklover)

01:31 pm ~ marblefeet9,693 notes

HD
Mr. Dodd’s dust-yard, illustration from the book Journeys through London, or, byways of modern Babylon by James Greenwood, undated, c.1873

Greenwood describes the dust-yard as being ‘as near as I could guess, about a hundred and fifty feet wide and seventy broad, one end opening on to the main street and the other to the Regent’s Canal. Flanking one side of the yard were a score or so of upreared dustcarts, and on the other side, extending almost from the outer gate to the water’s brink, were great mounds of ordinary dustbin muck; and in the midst of the mounds - literally, so that in many cases part only of their bodies were visible - were thirty or forty women and girls’. Each woman was sifting through the rubbish, and most of them ‘wore coarse, fingerless gloves, and all of them had great lace-up boots, such as carmen wear, and great sackcloth aprons, such as few carmen would care to be burdened with.

Oh, just like in Dickens’ Our Mutual Friend!

Mr. Dodd’s dust-yard, illustration from the book Journeys through London, or, byways of modern Babylon by James Greenwood, undated, c.1873

Greenwood describes the dust-yard as being ‘as near as I could guess, about a hundred and fifty feet wide and seventy broad, one end opening on to the main street and the other to the Regent’s Canal. Flanking one side of the yard were a score or so of upreared dustcarts, and on the other side, extending almost from the outer gate to the water’s brink, were great mounds of ordinary dustbin muck; and in the midst of the mounds - literally, so that in many cases part only of their bodies were visible - were thirty or forty women and girls’. Each woman was sifting through the rubbish, and most of them ‘wore coarse, fingerless gloves, and all of them had great lace-up boots, such as carmen wear, and great sackcloth aprons, such as few carmen would care to be burdened with.

Oh, just like in Dickens’ Our Mutual Friend!

08:06 am ~ marblefeet

08:01 am ~ marblefeet819 notes

HD
oldbookillustrations:

… And Barbara’s mother beat her umbrella to the floor until it was nearly worn down to the gingham.

Hablot Browne, from Master Humphrey’s clock, by Charles Dickens, London, 1840.

oldbookillustrations:

… And Barbara’s mother beat her umbrella to the floor until it was nearly worn down to the gingham.

Hablot Browne, from Master Humphrey’s clock, by Charles Dickens, London, 1840.

12:37 pm ~ marblefeet12 notes

Oh, haggard mind, groping darkly through the past; incapable of detaching itself from the miserable present; dragging its heavy chain of care through imaginary feasts and revels, and scenes of awful pomp; seeking but a moment’s rest among the long-forgotten haunts of childhood, and the resorts of yesterday; and dimly finding fear and horror everywhere!
Charles Dickens

(via libraryland)

06:54 pm ~ marblefeet3 notes